Pro-Life Arguments about Late Term Abortion Miss the Mark

In the wake of the last United States Presidential debate on Wednesday, the subject of abortion and a woman’s right to choose was one emotional issue. The popular topic hasn’t lost any followers or comments this week, as bloggers, journalists, and political pundits have taken the perennial debate online.


“Late term abortion” is an unfortunately misinforming term, that many people mistake for “3rd trimester abortions” only and “partial-birth abortion” only. Roughly 95% of all abortions happen in the 1st trimester. Late term abortions can be defined as either 2nd or 3rd trimester. 3rd trimester abortions happen very, very rarely, if at all, and partial-birth abortion has been banned nationally since 2007.

Late term abortions nearly always occur due to severe defects found in the baby that are not detectable earlier on, or the mother’s health, and yes, the mother’s health can be suddenly imperiled at those stages. Even in 2016, pregnancy is risky and complicated.


There are several articles currently floating about (here and here) in which mothers describe the heart-wrenching decision to have “late term abortions”–in at least 2 of the articles, they are early 2nd trimester abortions–due to the baby’s severe poor health and lack of viability. Then there are the counter-articles, like Matt Walsh’s Facebook post (ah, Matt! We meet again), which exudes much self-righteous wrath but little information.

Many pro-lifers show very little understanding (or at least, admission) of the complexity of human life. They also seem to have the tendency to highlight the few cases in which doctors were wrong, never guessing how often doctors were right. Just as Matt Walsh expresses no idea of the immense risks or even likelihood of successful infant heart transplants, yet blasts the mother for “not wanting to deal with her son’s medical issues,” so others try to paint abortion with a very wide brush. Favorite words thrown about as stones that maim and kill, include “selfish,” “brutal,” “callous,” “holocaust,” “murderer.”

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“He may have moved inside me for only five months, but he had touched and shaped me in ways I could never have imagined…He made me more compassionate and more patient. He taught me to love with reckless abandon, despite the knowledge that I could lose it all.” Source

The heartbreaking truth is some babies are born to die. Some babies are conceived, never to be born, or born alive. My first-born would have been 13 years old in 6 days, but for a heart condition not unlike the one described in the first article. I carried to term, happily ignorant of the imminent danger I was in due to severe complications of that pregnancy. I carried to term, confident in the belief God would heal my baby, and she lived 22 hours, not moving, on morphine because she was in such pain, on a breathing machine, with tubes going every which way. Looking back, I would have made the same choice but I can understand why other mothers, just as loving, would choose differently.

Every life is precious, but not every life is meant to be long-lived. Not every parent has a say in the decision for life for their child, but they should get to decide how they grieve. Those babies and children who die too soon, change others’ lives in big ways and small. They may not become doctors or lawyers, they may not live to take their first steps or even their first breath, but they are precious and they are loved.

Which mother is right? The one who prevents long-term suffering of her helpless child, or the one who allows it with a vain hope of miraculous healing? Can you judge their hearts? Will you cast the first stone?

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My New Baby (Book)!

My new baby! Described by my husband as “well-written but weird”, this short book was inspired by personal dreams and way too much reading of Christian mystics over the past 2 years. It is with great pride and just a little trepidation that I present my new e-book, available exclusively on Amazon’s Kindle: I Am My Beloved’s: A Mystical Allegory

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Is it a work of fiction, or not? Is it meant to be disturbing or reassuring? A work as mysterious as the subject matter, this short piece features the emotional highs and lows of spiritual mysticism from a Christian perspective.

I’d love to hear your thoughts! https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01LX71IQZ#nav-subnav


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War! What is it Good For?

Peace, love and understanding; Is there no place for them today? They say we must fight to keep our freedom, but Lord knows there’s got to be a better way.  – Edwin Starr, War

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WWI Archive, Flickr Commons

I was watching a documentary on diets the other night when a European doctor quipped, “Americans love to have an enemy.” I was stunned. How insightful, and as I considered the statement, I concluded he was right!

No matter the issue, we Americans do love to have an enemy to identify, attack, and annihilate. Be it obesity, cancer, politics, foreign relations, politics, AIDS, or poverty, we describe it as “war”; “fighting” against something or other. War on cancer, war on poverty, culture wars, the fight against obesity, and it of course spills over into religions too.

On the positive side, these are evidences we are a passionate people. We are willing to sacrifice and put ourselves on the front lines for whatever cause we believe in from feminism to religion, atheism, education, the environment, and many others. We are not afraid to protest, sign petitions, call our government, and otherwise make our voices heard.

All people need a purpose, a hope, and a reason to persevere through life, but living in a self (or media)-manufactured war zone day-to-day is unbalanced and exhausting. We do unnecessary trauma to ourselves and others who we tend to wrongly view as “the enemy”, in the name of war.

“But now, for the first time, I see you are a man like me. I thought of your hand-grenades, of your bayonet, of your rifle; now I see your wife and your face and our fellowship. Forgive me, comrade. We always see it too late.

Why do they never tell us that you are poor devils like us, that your mothers are just as anxious as ours, and that we have the same fear of death, and the same dying and the same agony–Forgive me, comrade; how could you be my enemy?” ― Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front

Destruction of WWI_zWar is made to appear glorious in the media. War is always painted as good guys (“you”) vs. bad guys (“them”); good vs. evil. In reality, it isn’t usually so simple. In reality there are typically passionate people fighting viciously with other passionate people in a bid to conquer evil or establish justice, as each side would view it. Sometimes, ironically, as both sides would see it.

“All for one and one for all, united we stand divided we fall.” ― Alexandre Dumas, The Three Musketeers

With this 2016 Presidential election coming up in November, I have never seen my beautiful, diverse country so stridently divided on nearly every issue. Emotions are running very, very high as most everyone is terrified of “the other side” and are choosing to vote not their conscience, but their fear. Why would politicians want a divided, unsettled populace?

[If your enemy’s] forces are united, separate them. If sovereign and subject are in accord, put division between them. – Sun Tzu, The Art of War

Politicians know that war is good for three things: unifying a country by giving it national purpose, boosting economy, and gaining power for themselves. Religious leaders understand the same things. By giving their followers something to fight for, they mobilize people to action and make a lot of money in the process. In the end, it is only politicians and religious leaders who win.

Let us not destroy our country and our people in an effort to make America her best yet.

“Anger may in time change to gladness; vexation may be succeeded by content.
But a kingdom that has once been destroyed can never come again into being; nor can the dead ever be brought back to life.” ― Sun Tzu, The Art of War

Shell of a building WWI_z

Say it again…


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Read More About It:

The Top 10 Reasons American Politics are Worse than Ever

Wholeness and Spiritual Healing

12 years ago, my husband and I lost an infant daughter. A few years passed, and a well-meaning family member (who was not around at the time of our baby’s death) suggested to my husband and I, that God could bring spiritual and emotional wholeness/healing into our lives again if we would let Him.

My husband and I smiled politely and internally dismissed this family member’s view, because they didn’t really “know”. They didn’t see how deep the wound went; how life-altering the wound was. Yes, God can heal and does heal, and He gave us 3 more beautiful, healthy children and a variety of lovely “fur-babies” as well. Each baby has brought joy and hope and love into our lives, and our wounds have healed. Still, there are deep scars that cause pain from time to time. These scars are reminders of our love for our baby. They will never heal completely as if she didn’t exist, nor would we want them to. Our hearts were broken that day, we were changed forever, but it was after all, a good change, not a “good wound”.

The same can be said of others’ deep wounds. There will be scarring of the heart and mind; they will never be the same person again. Just as healing from a surgery takes time, or certain physical wounds may never fully heal, these realities do not negate God’s love, compassion, or healing abilities. We are healed, but we are scarred. That is how God built people inside and out.